syn·site

sin.sīt
noun, verb

an amorphous situating.
an entangled situating.
an active situating.
this situating, pulled taut*.
this situating, presented.
this situating, released.
that situating, re-presented.
that situating, represented.
that situating, situated.

an amorphous situating.
an entangled situating.
an active situating.
this situating, pulled taut*.
this situating, presented.
this situating, released.
that situating, re-presented.
that situating, represented.
that situating, situated.

SYN (along with, at the same time | from Greek SYN, with | ~SYNTHETIC) + SITE (N: point of event, occupied space, internet address; V: to place in position | from Latin SITUS, location, idleness, forgetfulness | ~WEBSITE ¬cite ¬sight), cf. SITE/NON-SITE (from Robert Smithson, A PROVISIONAL THEORY OF NONSITES, 1968)

As Arthur Jafa explains: “It has to do with a certain kind of contextual dissonance. When you place a thing in a context that didn’t generate it, there’s a weird slippage or dissonance that happens, a certain movement.” This results in Jafa managing “to worry the note,” as he expresses it, and in doing so achieve “affective proximity.” The invisible becomes visible.

As Arthur Jafa explains: “It has to do with a certain kind of contextual dissonance. When you place a thing in a context that didn’t generate it, there’s a weird slippage or dissonance that happens, a certain movement.” This results in Jafa managing “to worry the note,” as he expresses it, and in doing so achieve “affective proximity.” The invisible becomes visible.

As Arthur Jafa explains: “It has to do with a certain kind of contextual dissonance. When you place a thing in a context that didn’t generate it, there’s a weird slippage or dissonance that happens, a certain movement.” This results in Jafa managing “to worry the note,” as he expresses it, and in doing so achieve “affective proximity.” The invisible becomes visible.

This connection is a transclusion that is the same content in two places. It is not a link. It is not represented by link structures. It is differently found. [...]

We see as we step through the connections on this page that the other documents swarf into position — it's swoop plus morph — and the connections become exactly readable. So one connection at a time we can follow what the connections actually mean, even though we are in a huge conglomerate of many different connections. [...]

This same structure can be used to represent any mix of audio, video, and text so that you can use this type of link — or flink as we call it, floating link — for in and out points on audio and video. You can edit in-place and create arbitrarily rich, transclusive structures [...] See, this to me is a real representation in depth of literature as it should always have been and anything less is a compromise with tradition and shallowness.

This connection is a transclusion that is the same content in two places. It is not a link. It is not represented by link structures. It is differently found. [...]

We see as we step through the connections on this page that the other documents swarf into position — it's swoop plus morph — and the connections become exactly readable. So one connection at a time we can follow what the connections actually mean, even though we are in a huge conglomerate of many different connections. [...]

This same structure can be used to represent any mix of audio, video, and text so that you can use this type of link — or flink as we call it, floating link — for in and out points on audio and video. You can edit in-place and create arbitrarily rich, transclusive structures [...] See, this to me is a real representation in depth of literature as it should always have been and anything less is a compromise with tradition and shallowness.

This connection is a transclusion that is the same content in two places. It is not a link. It is not represented by link structures. It is differently found. [...]

We see as we step through the connections on this page that the other documents swarf into position — it's swoop plus morph — and the connections become exactly readable. So one connection at a time we can follow what the connections actually mean, even though we are in a huge conglomerate of many different connections. [...]

This same structure can be used to represent any mix of audio, video, and text so that you can use this type of link — or flink as we call it, floating link — for in and out points on audio and video. You can edit in-place and create arbitrarily rich, transclusive structures [...] See, this to me is a real representation in depth of literature as it should always have been and anything less is a compromise with tradition and shallowness.

Sanko-time is a concept developed by [Larry Achiampong] that relates to the Ghanaian Twi word Sankofa, which roughly translates as ‘to go back for what has been left behind’ and alludes to using the past to prepare for the future. [...] Sanko-time takes the listener through a rich soundscape connected by the Greenwich Meridian.

Threaded with a powerful narrative about the legacy of colonialism from Achiampong, Sanko-time is a hypnotic synthesis of poetry, field recordings and music, including drum loops by the late Tony Allen an Afrobeat pioneer who brought together elements of Ghanaian Highlife and Jazz. The work is infused with the sounds and rhythms of Accra and London, including the lapping waves of Jamestown (the fishing harbour in Accra) and the water of the Royal Docks, as well as the street sounds of Accra’s Makola Market. The tides and empires explored in Sanko-time rise and fall to reveal the imprints of histories and the colonial past in our present.

Sanko-time is a concept developed by [Larry Achiampong] that relates to the Ghanaian Twi word Sankofa, which roughly translates as ‘to go back for what has been left behind’ and alludes to using the past to prepare for the future. [...] Sanko-time takes the listener through a rich soundscape connected by the Greenwich Meridian.

Threaded with a powerful narrative about the legacy of colonialism from Achiampong, Sanko-time is a hypnotic synthesis of poetry, field recordings and music, including drum loops by the late Tony Allen an Afrobeat pioneer who brought together elements of Ghanaian Highlife and Jazz. The work is infused with the sounds and rhythms of Accra and London, including the lapping waves of Jamestown (the fishing harbour in Accra) and the water of the Royal Docks, as well as the street sounds of Accra’s Makola Market. The tides and empires explored in Sanko-time rise and fall to reveal the imprints of histories and the colonial past in our present.

Sanko-time is a concept developed by [Larry Achiampong] that relates to the Ghanaian Twi word Sankofa, which roughly translates as ‘to go back for what has been left behind’ and alludes to using the past to prepare for the future. [...] Sanko-time takes the listener through a rich soundscape connected by the Greenwich Meridian.

Threaded with a powerful narrative about the legacy of colonialism from Achiampong, Sanko-time is a hypnotic synthesis of poetry, field recordings and music, including drum loops by the late Tony Allen an Afrobeat pioneer who brought together elements of Ghanaian Highlife and Jazz. The work is infused with the sounds and rhythms of Accra and London, including the lapping waves of Jamestown (the fishing harbour in Accra) and the water of the Royal Docks, as well as the street sounds of Accra’s Makola Market. The tides and empires explored in Sanko-time rise and fall to reveal the imprints of histories and the colonial past in our present.

..."cut-up" (we would now say "remix") culture is discussed in which digital technologies provide a platform for individuals to respond to authoritarian top-down messaging/massaging. Remixes become "a critical weapon against spectacular society." Bukatman discusses William S. Burroughs, Jean Baudrillard and Don Delillo (specifically the novel White Noise) here; and he goes on to argue, "The scrambling of language defamiliarizes it, revealing its pervasiveness and operant illusions."

..."cut-up" (we would now say "remix") culture is discussed in which digital technologies provide a platform for individuals to respond to authoritarian top-down messaging/massaging. Remixes become "a critical weapon against spectacular society." Bukatman discusses William S. Burroughs, Jean Baudrillard and Don Delillo (specifically the novel White Noise) here; and he goes on to argue, "The scrambling of language defamiliarizes it, revealing its pervasiveness and operant illusions."

..."cut-up" (we would now say "remix") culture is discussed in which digital technologies provide a platform for individuals to respond to authoritarian top-down messaging/massaging. Remixes become "a critical weapon against spectacular society." Bukatman discusses William S. Burroughs, Jean Baudrillard and Don Delillo (specifically the novel White Noise) here; and he goes on to argue, "The scrambling of language defamiliarizes it, revealing its pervasiveness and operant illusions."

Take a walk down a city street ... You have seen a person cut in two by a car, bits and pieces of street signs and advertisements, reflections from shop windows – a montage of fragments ... Consciousness is a cut-up; life is a cut-up.

Take a walk down a city street ... You have seen a person cut in two by a car, bits and pieces of street signs and advertisements, reflections from shop windows – a montage of fragments ... Consciousness is a cut-up; life is a cut-up.

Take a walk down a city street ... You have seen a person cut in two by a car, bits and pieces of street signs and advertisements, reflections from shop windows – a montage of fragments ... Consciousness is a cut-up; life is a cut-up.

Most of the images are found footage, taken from YouTube. Their emotional impact comes from the way Jafa has put them together, shifting and editing and choreographing to create a flow of deeply resonant juxtapositions, over a soundtrack of Kanye West’s ecstatic “Ultralight Beam.”

Most of the images are found footage, taken from YouTube. Their emotional impact comes from the way Jafa has put them together, shifting and editing and choreographing to create a flow of deeply resonant juxtapositions, over a soundtrack of Kanye West’s ecstatic “Ultralight Beam.”

Most of the images are found footage, taken from YouTube. Their emotional impact comes from the way Jafa has put them together, shifting and editing and choreographing to create a flow of deeply resonant juxtapositions, over a soundtrack of Kanye West’s ecstatic “Ultralight Beam.”

[...] I must have been five years old and I was trailing my hand in the water and I thought about how the water was moving around my fingers — opening on one side and closing on the other — and that changing system of relationships where everything was kind of similar, kind of the same, and yet different. That was so difficult to visualize and express. And just generalizing that the world is a system of ever-changing relationships and structures struck me as a vast truth. Which it is! [...]

Writing is the process of reducing a tapestry of interconnection to a narrow sequence. This is a wrongful compression of what should spread out.

In today's computers they betrayed that because there's no system for decent "cut-and-paste" and they changed the meaning of the words "cut-and-paste" and pretended it was the same thing. [...] I consider that to be a crime against humanity [...] because humanity has no decent writing tools. In any case, this is the problem of interconnection and representation and sequentialization all similar to the issue of water.

[...] I must have been five years old and I was trailing my hand in the water and I thought about how the water was moving around my fingers — opening on one side and closing on the other — and that changing system of relationships where everything was kind of similar, kind of the same, and yet different. That was so difficult to visualize and express. And just generalizing that the world is a system of ever-changing relationships and structures struck me as a vast truth. Which it is! [...]

Writing is the process of reducing a tapestry of interconnection to a narrow sequence. This is a wrongful compression of what should spread out.

In today's computers they betrayed that because there's no system for decent "cut-and-paste" and they changed the meaning of the words "cut-and-paste" and pretended it was the same thing. [...] I consider that to be a crime against humanity [...] because humanity has no decent writing tools. In any case, this is the problem of interconnection and representation and sequentialization all similar to the issue of water.

[...] I must have been five years old and I was trailing my hand in the water and I thought about how the water was moving around my fingers — opening on one side and closing on the other — and that changing system of relationships where everything was kind of similar, kind of the same, and yet different. That was so difficult to visualize and express. And just generalizing that the world is a system of ever-changing relationships and structures struck me as a vast truth. Which it is! [...]

Writing is the process of reducing a tapestry of interconnection to a narrow sequence. This is a wrongful compression of what should spread out.

In today's computers they betrayed that because there's no system for decent "cut-and-paste" and they changed the meaning of the words "cut-and-paste" and pretended it was the same thing. [...] I consider that to be a crime against humanity [...] because humanity has no decent writing tools. In any case, this is the problem of interconnection and representation and sequentialization all similar to the issue of water.

Concepts are concrete assemblages, like the configurations of a machine, but the plane [of immanence] is the abstract machine of which these assemblages are the working parts.

Concepts are concrete assemblages, like the configurations of a machine, but the plane [of immanence] is the abstract machine of which these assemblages are the working parts.

Concepts are concrete assemblages, like the configurations of a machine, but the plane [of immanence] is the abstract machine of which these assemblages are the working parts.

You could argue that sampling poisoned the well. On the other hand, it is true that in homeopathic medicine, and sometimes in magic, you put a drop of the bad thing, the thing you fight, into water or some other medium. Sampling may be invasive, negating repetition, disordering us, but then that’s the wish of every man, to disorder, to mayhem.

You could argue that sampling poisoned the well. On the other hand, it is true that in homeopathic medicine, and sometimes in magic, you put a drop of the bad thing, the thing you fight, into water or some other medium. Sampling may be invasive, negating repetition, disordering us, but then that’s the wish of every man, to disorder, to mayhem.

You could argue that sampling poisoned the well. On the other hand, it is true that in homeopathic medicine, and sometimes in magic, you put a drop of the bad thing, the thing you fight, into water or some other medium. Sampling may be invasive, negating repetition, disordering us, but then that’s the wish of every man, to disorder, to mayhem.